Topics covered include
Cinema 4D, Deformers, Dynamics

In this video you will learn how to model, texture & animate googly eyes quickly and easily using Dynamics in Cinema 4D!

New to Cinema 4D?  Watch my Free Cinema 4D Lite for the 2D Animator Series!

Topics covered include:
• Modeling the plastic googly eye
• How to use the Collision Deformer for modeling parametric objects
• Create a nice glass texture
• Learn how to use different Dynamic Shapes for perfect simulations
• How to use the Expert Dynamic settings for error free simulations

If you have any questions, be sure to post it in the comments section and if you create any googly eyed goodness, be sure to share it with me!  Thanks for watching!

This was recorded live on the Live Design Stream. To get alerted for future live design casts & get sneak peeks at new tutorials before anyone else, sign up for the Eyedesyn Newsletter.

Tutorial:


Topics covered include
After Effects, Animation, Cinema 4D, Cinema 4D Lite, Deformers

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In this exclusive Cineversity tutorial series, we’re going to learn how to create and manipulate Splines and get an introduction to Sweep Objects to create a 2D cel shaded style 3D cursive logo animation using Cinema 4D Lite.  Then, you’ll discover how to easily apply cel shading to their objects to turn their objects into 2D elements using a few of the versatile tools inside C4D Lite.  Then, I’ll give you little introduction into animating in Cinema 4D; covering keyframe creation, manipulation, and using the Timeline, all the while relating it with terms and techniques familiar to how one would animate using After Effects.  Finally, I’ll cover how easy it is to seamlessly composite your 3D C4D Lite project with 2D effects in After Effects using Cineware, a live bridge between C4D Lite and After Effects.  This course will help give After Effects users, or anyone new to Cinema 4D, the perfect starting point to begin becoming familiar with integrating Cinema 4D into their 2D pipeline.  Let’s play with some 3D!


How to Create a Cursive Logo Using Splines

In this video we’ll create our cursive logo using the Spline tools inside Cinema 4D Lite.


Using Sweep Object to Create Cursive Logo Geometry

In After Effects, a path without a fill or stroke applied to it will not render in your composition.  Similarly, in Cinema 4D Lite, a spline will not render until you use another object to generate 3D geometry with it.  In this video, we’ll cover how we generate 3D geometry from our cursive splines using a Generator Object called Sweep Objects.


Giving Z Depth to Splines

Since we’re working in 3D space, we can add Z depth to our spline by adjusting our spline points in Z space.


Add 2D Cel Materials to Cursive Logo

Now to add some color to our 3D cursive logo by apply 2D cel style shading using what’s called the Lumas Shader.


Animating the Cursive Logo

With our cursive logo looking good with our cel shading applied, we’ll utilize some of the options inside our Sweep Objects to animate our cursive logo onto the screen.


Render Settings for Cineware & AE Compositing

Now that you made a fun 2D style cursive logo animation in Cinema 4D Lite, it’s time to prep it for being composited in After Effects.


What’s in the Full Version of Cinema 4D?

If you’re looking to unlock the full potential of what Cinema 4D has to offer, the Broadcast and Studio versions include a deformer called Spline Wrap that can take any piece of geometry and wrap it along a spline, opening up a ton of possibilities when it comes to create cursive logos.

Learn More About Cinema 4D Lite

To keep up with the latest Cinema 4D Lite tutorials sign up to the Eyedesyn Newsletter!

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Topics covered include
Interview

50/50 #mograph #loop #3D #footage #selfportrait #cinema4D #3Dtrack #design #art #kidmograph

A video posted by KIDMOGRAPH™ (@kidmograph) on

Welcome to the second installment of the “Eye on Design” series where I’ll highlight amazing artists that you need to keep an eye on!  For this month I’ll be highlighting one of the most well known and respected GIF artists, Gustavo Torres (AKA KidMograph).   Gustavo is on the cutting edge of experimental motion graphics, making killer visuals 3 loopable seconds at a time!  His aesthetic is a mixture of 80’s & sci-fi design with a surreal spin.  Let’s get to know more about the man behind Kidmograph!


I’m pretty sure most of the Internet knows KidMograph but for those out there who live under a rock, can you tell us a little bit about the man behind KidMograph?

I’m a middle aged guy living and working from Argentina. Me and my wife Clara (@render_fruit) work together in our studio and have an amazing almost 11 years old daughter 🙂


Your work has a totally tubular 80s vibe to them.  What inspired you to get into design and what artists/styles influence your artwork?

Yes.  I used my 80’s growing childhood and remixed some of the concepts that were so great in that decade.  Always really moved me is that way to look at the future in a nostalgic and literal manner. It’s very descriptive.  It resumes very well what you want to say, and how. It’s concrete. Also, the technologic limited resources of that time, and the mixture between traditional art. All mixed with the beginning of the home computer.  Because that was happening to me in the process of trying to be an illustrator.  Always been caught by the amazing video game posters and publicity.  Comics.  The advertising art that is not relevant but takes concepts from surrealism and mix them with futuristic concepts. The 80’s has that feeling of an endless happiness trip, and at the same time I think it worked really well with people.  Even more than then newest technologies of today.  The lack of resources is always a good resource.  Sometimes a bit cheesy and shallow, but beautiful, nostalgic and literal. It is fantasy, but based on reality.  My most important task making art is trying to leave an impression on the viewer, and the end of 80’s, early 90’s has this impact on me.  I can really relate to that age with the works of Hajime Sorayama and Patrick Nagel to name a few.


You’re very well known for your GIFs on Tumblr.  How did you get into the GIF game and what do you enjoy most about the medium?

I remember around the end of 2011, where I finished a big stage on my work making tons of paid work doing music videos, that I felt the need of making side projects. Projects that I really wanted to do without anyone telling me about notes and changes and styles.  It was a very hard time for me in the emotional and economic fields, and decided to start making simple things almost everyday (in a non orthodox way).  Some days I was doing 3 GIFs in a row, others just thinking about scenes.  But the thought was giving all my ideas a shape.  That’s where I thought a blog could help me to achieve it, and Tumblr came into my life.  Over 4 years, I have uploaded more than 1000 GIFs there.  After all this time, I’m part of the Tumblr Creators initiative, which different artists can link with brands around the globe for online campaigns.  I only can say I love them.

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You’re quite the Renaissance man designing for multiple mediums;  You’re making GIFs, concert visuals, now you’re experimenting with 3D tracking.  You mentioned you want to get into VR.  Can you talk to the benefits of trying out all these different outlets?

Yes.  Only through diversity do you acquire and refine your taste.  Adding diversity into your work is a very healthy way to get better at what you do.  It’s like eating, you might have 3-4 favorite meals, but you need to taste several to see what you like most.  Combinations are almost endless.  Art is not much different on that regard.  One day I feel the need to do an endless/timeless loop about a certain idea.  Others, I dive deep into longer scenes.  Everything gives you new feelings & experiences that you can learn from.


Staying on the subject of those different mediums, what was the most challenging and which did you enjoy the most?

Well, music videos can be very challenging.  You have to combine several techniques in 3-4 minutes without losing the subject, and without losing the people attention.  Tons of things involved.  Footage/compositing/fx/audio-video sync…3 minutes looks like nothing to the spectator.  But for you can be endless.  Passing from the angry to the joy to deception.  B ut I’ve learnt a lot like in no other field.

But for sure what I enjoy the most is making live visual packages for DJs and musicians.  I’m at a point that I’ve transformed all my personal works and motive into my actual work, and people reference my current work/style as examples of the types of projects they want me to create for them.  And that’s priceless.  I’m very grateful.

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What’s one of your favorite pieces of artwork you’ve done and why?

I have so many animations that represent me and my work, but this one in particular does it very well.

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Done 2 years ago, and in about half hour.  It has all I need for a GIF.  Speed, the lo-fi feeling, the travelings.  City landscapes in a retro-future highway.  Sometimes it’s the shorter amount of time you spend creating images that the more accurate and powerful it gets.  Keep the mind focused, and don’t waste time.


Did you start out as a 2D designer before you got into 3D and if so, what was the most difficult thing for you jumping into 3D?

Yes, like i guess the majority who has my age did.  First of all, I’m an illustrator/painter.  Did my Bachelor in beauty arts from 13 to 19 years old and you can imagine the most advanced thing was taking photocopies.  When I started working in After Effects in 2003 i thought that was it. It was a really key moment in my pairing career.  But always felt the flatter work (or 2.5D) like a limit.  That’s where I’ve discovered Cinema 4D and boom, my brain changed the way to create and understood that the limits were only in my mind.  It enhanced my perspective 1000X.  But it wasn’t easy.  Even today I have lots of things to learn and trying to use both 2D/3D in a way they can coexists nicely.  Pipelines can be hard, but you must search for a method that works for you regardless which software you use.


What’s the one thing in C4D you couldn’t live without?

Cloner Object and the Displacement Deformer are two of my main tools.  I use them everyday.


Tell us more about the music videos you made for The Strokes.

Those projects were pretty much straight forward.  They loved all the GIF animation I have been doing and asked me to make 2 lyric videos and a few presentations that appeared in the streets in form of loop-able videos.  The lo-fi and nostalgic feeling of this pieces, plus their amazing sounds and lyrics were joined and we think they accomplished their objective. Plus, lots of people in my country who don’t know me were able to find my work 🙂

 

Keep an eye on Kidmograph’s work by following him on Instagram, Twitter, and on his website.


More of KidMograph’s work:

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Topics covered include
Adobe Illustrator, Animation, Cinema 4D, MoGraph

Learn how you can create a fun, colorful animated countdown using Cinema 4D’s Mograph Module!

New to Cinema 4D? Watch my Free Cinema 4D Lite for the 2D Animator Series!


Topics covered include:

• Using Illustrator to create our numbers
• Using Extrude Objects to create 3D geometry in Cinema 4D
• Animating objects using Random Effectors
• Using the Variation Shader to texture Mograph Clones
• How to blur Soft Shadows for nice shading
• A Handy Use of Set Driver/Set Driven XPresso
• Learn how to manually keyframe a decaying bounce curve

If you have any questions, be sure to post it in the comments section and if you create anything cool using this technique, be sure to share it with me! Thanks for watching!

This was recorded live on the Live Design Stream. To get alerted for future live design casts & get sneak peeks at new tutorials before anyone else, sign up for the Eyedesyn Newsletter.

Tutorial:


Topics covered include
Animation, Cinema 4D, Deformers, Sketch & Toon

It was an honor to be asked to present at my first SIGGRAPH for MAXON!  Thanks to all who made it great and thanks to everyone who made the trip out to actually watch some of our presentations live!   Five volumes of SIGGRAPH Cineversity presentations are up that you can watch below, including my presentation that is an intro to rigging, character animation, and how to turn your C4D projects into VR videos!  If you’re a total noob at character animation, be sure to check out my presentation!  Enjoy!

EJ Hassenfratz

Siggraph 2016 Rewind – EJ Hassenfratz: 2D Character Animation from Cineversity.

Athanasios Pozantzis

Siggraph 2016 Rewind – Athanasios Pozantzis: What’s Next in Cinema 4D from Cineversity.

Chris Schmidt

Siggraph 2016 Rewind – Chris Schmidt: Creating Advanced Controllable Dynamic Splines and Tentacles from Cineversity.

Melissa Oakley

Siggraph 2016 Rewind – Melissa Oakley: From Sports to eSports: Creating a Broadcast Package from Cineversity.

Nick Campbell

Siggraph 2016 Rewind – Nick Campbell: Breaking New Ground in Cinema 4D from Cineversity.

Carlos Ferrer

Siggraph 2016 Rewind – Carlos Ferrer: Cinema 4D for Filmmakers from Cineversity.

Sekani Solomon

Siggraph 2016 Rewind – Sekani Solomon: Creating Dynamic Animated Crystals from Cineversity.

Nik Hill

Siggraph 2016 Rewind – Nik Hill: Designing and Modeling 3D Assets in C4D from Cineversity.

Derya Öztürk

Siggraph 2016 Rewind – Derya Ozturk: New MoGraph Features in R18 from Cineversity.

Brett Morris

Siggraph 2016 Rewind – Brett Morris: Procedural Methods for Motion Response from Cineversity.

Chad Ashley

Siggraph 2016 Rewind – Chad Ashley: R18, Arnold and Other Cures for Bad Clients from Cineversity.

Sekani Solomon

Siggraph 2016 Rewind – Sekani Solomon: The Dolby at AMC Prime Preshow from Cineversity.

Robert Paraguassu: Archer in 3D: Cinema 4Dangerzone

Siggraph 2016 Rewind – Trevor Kerr: Hollywood VFX on an Indie Budget from Cineversity.

Trevor Kerr: Hollywood VFX on an Indie Budget

Siggraph 2016 Rewind – Trevor Kerr: Hollywood VFX on an Indie Budget from Cineversity.

Casey Hupke: MoGraph Improvements in R18

Siggraph 2016 Rewind – Casey Hupke: MoGraph Improvements in R18 from Cineversity.

Ryan Summers: 50 Tips in 50 Minutes

Siggraph 2016 Rewind – Ryan Summers: 50 Tips in 50 Minutes from Cineversity.

Nik Hill

Siggraph 2016 Rewind – Nik Hill: MoGraph Tricks and Tips to Supplement Your Workflow from Cineversity.

Sam Balcomb

Siggraph 2016 Rewind – Sam Balcomb: Metroid: Motion Capture, and Sci-Fi Environments from Cineversity.


Derya Öztürk

Siggraph 2016 Rewind – Derya Öztürk: New MoGraph Effectors in R18 from Cineversity.

Chad Ashley

Siggraph 2016 Rewind – Chad Ashley: Color Grading for the 3D Artist from Cineversity.

Athanasios Pozantzis

Siggraph 2016 Rewind – Athanasios Pozantzis: Tips, Tricks and Techniques for Medical Animation from Cineversity.


Topics covered include
Photoshop

In this tutorial, I’m going to cover the best GIF optimization techniques in Photoshop to help make your Cinema 4D renders look super nice with the lowest file sizes possible so you can easily post them in GIF form anywhere on the interwebs!  GIFs are all the rage these days and its important to learn how you can make them look as good as possible no matter what type of image you’re dealing with!  Oh, and GIF is pronounced GUH-IF.  Get outta here with your jifs! 😉

In this tutorial you’ll:

•  Tackle 4 unique animation scenarios utilizing different optimization techniques for each one

•  Learn all about color reduction algorithms, Diffusion options, and Web Snap

•  Optimize each scene balancing low file size with best image quality

•  Pronounce GIF the right way

If you have any questions, be sure to post it in the comments section and if you create any cool GIFs, I’d love to see them!  Thanks for watching!

To keep up with the latest Cinema 4D tutorials sign up to the Eyedesyn Newsletter!

Subscribe


Topics covered include
Interview

Fishies0000

Welcome to the first installment of the “Eye on Design” series where I’ll highlight amazing artists that you need to keep an eye on!  The first artist I’ll be highlighting is one of my favorites, Stuart Wade, who has a very unique 3D style that I absolutely love.  The compositions he creates using simple 3D shapes are brilliant!  Recently, he’s been doing live streams on Youtube that allow you to get a peek into his process!  Let’s see what makes Stuart tick in this short interview I had with him.


Introduce yourself to the interwebs!  Who’s this Stuart guy?

Hello webs! I’m Stuart Wade, but you may also know me by my online moniker, DLGNCE. (Like diligence, but spelled all fancy.) I’m a digital artist, designer and illustrator currently residing in San Francisco. I was born in New York City, grew up in the Philadelphia area, and moved to SF after marrying my amazing wife Jackie about 3 years ago. She’s also a graphic designer, and the opportunities for creatives in the Bay Area are pretty awesome. 

When my nose isn’t 6 inches from a monitor, I also really enjoy hiking, jogging and getting outside. I’m also frequently found in the kitchen, whipping up some tasty dishes for the wife and myself.


Describe your journey getting into design & 3D.

I suppose the whole journey started way back in my childhood. I grew up in the 80s, the son of some fairly creative parents. My Dad is a musician and amateur theater actor, and my Mom is an amazing painter working in traditional mediums. I always loved to draw and read comic books and I was lucky enough to grow up in an era replete with video games, Nickelodeon and the burgeoning internet. 

I’m fairly confident that immersing myself in these highly visual mediums lead me towards my current career path. I can distinctly remember making images in MS Word on my dad’s work laptop some 25 years ago. I wish I still had those files…

I realized in high school that it was possible to earn a living in the visual arts—and there was no way in hell I wanted to be an accountant! This led me to study graphic design and illustration at university. 

Always looking to experiment and grow my skill set, I started toying with 3d applications while working at my first job at a small agency in Pennsylvania. At first it was Google Sketchup, then Blender, but when I discovered Cinema 4D I really began to dive in and fully incorporate it into my workflow


What’s your favorite part about designing for the GIF medium?

I love the simplicity and share-ability of it all. Growing up alongside the internet, it feels like a medium that is truly our generations’. Years ago, gifs were considered the low-brow dregs of the internet. (Think cheesy rotating text and glittering MySpace backgrounds.) As bandwidth has gone up, and as mobile devices are more capable of handling animations, gifs are becoming a ubiquitous and well loved part of the digital landscape.

ThePractice-02-smilingLandscape-v2-Retouch

You have a very unique style, can you tell us some of your influences?

I try to draw my inspiration from all over. There is obviously more cool stuff on the internet than any one person could possibly look at. Social media provides a constant pipeline of eye candy and inspiration for me to stare at. Some of my favorite contemporary artists are AJ Fosik, Aryz, Ferris Plock, Raymond Lemstra, Grand Chamaco, Boy Kong and Sam Rodriguez. 

I also draw a ton of inspiration from nature and natural forms. There is a ton of beauty to be seen in the hills and water and foliage in the bay area. I have a collection of small succulent plants behind my workstation that keep me company while I peck away at 3d models, and they are a constant reminder of natures beauty. You’ve probably seen versions of them in some of my renderings!


What’s the one thing in Cinema 4D you couldn’t live without?

Great question… and a tough one to answer. These days, I suppose the Capsule primitive… It’s about as basic as it gets and I use it a lot!

Come-out-and-play0000

You’re a great example of not needing to know much about modeling to create some amazing 3D artwork.  I love how you utilize basic shapes and forms to create your GIFs.  Do you have any advice for people who are looking to get into 3D but may be too intimidated by 3D modeling?

Thanks!  I’ve always been a fan of playing to the medium, and allowing constraints to inform the final outcome (That’s why I also enjoy working with limited color palettes.) I believe composition and other visual fundamentals are far more important to the quality of the image than fancy geometry or lighting setups.  Not to mention the fact that I do all of my rendering from my laptop, so I try to keep my lighting and geometry fairly simple to cut down on render times. 

My advice would be to start out by playing and experimenting and learning the types of things C4D is good at, and how you can use it as a supplement to your existing work stream. After some initial exploration, I would take a more tactical approach. Figure out specific things you want to make, and learn how to make them.  The internet is FULL of amazing resources—like eyedesyn.com—that will teach you how to approach certain challenges you may be having with your projects. I’ve been working with C4D for about 6 or 7 years at this point, and I can say the times I’ve learned the most are when I’ve had to overcome specific roadblocks to achieve a particular result I had in mind. 

Lastly, I would also encourage folks to enjoy the process. Cinema 4D is a complex program and it’s going to take a long time to get good at it. So grab a drink, put on some tunes, and have fun digging in!


More of Stuart’s work:

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Keep an eye on Stuart’s work by following him on Instagram, Twitter, and on his website.

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Topics covered include
After Effects, Cinema 4D Lite

ae_c4d_gameboy

In this exclusive Cineversity tutorial series, we’re going to learn how to create Splines, Spline Objects, and use Extrude Objects to create a 2D cel shaded style 3D Game Boy.  We’ll then learn how to easily apply flat 2D shading to their objects, easily transforming your 3D objects into 2D elements that perfectly fit right in 2D animations inside of After Effects.  Finally, we’ll learn how to use the Mograph Module to apply procedural animation to out objects.  This course will give After Effects users a starting point to begin becoming familiar with using Cinema 4D in their 2D pipeline.  Ready Player 1?

 


How to Create Object Outlines Using Splines

In this tutorial, we’re going to learn what splines are (Cinema 4D’s version of paths) and how easy it is to create splines and spline objects using the spline tools in Cinema 4D Lite.  We will then learn how we can simply import Illustrator paths for use inside of Cinema 4D Lite.


How to Give Splines Depth Using Extrude Objects

In After Effects, a path by itself without a fill or stroke will not render.  In Cinema 4D Lite, a spline will not render until you generate 3D geometry with it.  We’ll cover how we can turn our splines into 3D objects using a generator object called the Extrude Object.


How to Apply Flat Colors to 3D Objects

In this video we’ll cover how we can give our 3D objects a flat, illustrative type feel, by applying very simple flat colors devoid of any diffuse shading.


Cel Shading 3D Objects Using Ambient Illumination

In this video, I’m going to cover an alternative method to manually applying flat colors to 3D objects and giving the illusion of cel shading by using Material Selections.  This alternative method uses a handy technique utilizing high contrast lights & Ambient Illumination.


Animate Objects with Mograph Effectors

Cinema 4D’s Mograph toolset is a game changer when it comes to procedurally animating objects quickly and easily.  In this video, I’ll cover Mograph Effectors and how they can quickly apply animation to our 3D artwork.


Render Settings for Cineware

In this video we’ll learn how to prepare your Cinema 4D Lite models for compositing inside of After Effects using Cineware, a live 3D bridge between AE and C4D that allows you to composite C4D elements into your After Effects scene without needing to render.


What’s in the Full Version of Cinema 4D?

In this video I’m going to cover the 2D cel shading Sketch and Toon module that is included in the full Studio or Visualize versions of Cinema 4D and how it can improve your 2D workflow.

Learn More About Cinema 4D Lite

To keep up with the latest Cinema 4D Lite tutorials sign up to the Eyedesyn Newsletter!

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Topics covered include
After Effects, Cel Shader, Cinema 4D, Cinema 4D Lite

In this tutorial, we’re going to have some fun creating pixel art inside of Cinema 4D, Cinema 4D Lite, and After Effects!  First I’ll cover the super easy workflow to turn your 3D compositions into pixelated 8 bit style renders directly in of Cinema 4D without any need to bring into Photoshop or After Effects.  Then, I’ll show you how you can use Sketch & Toon to create Nintendo style 8 bit looks devoid of 3D shading.  Finally, I’ll show you the workflow Adobe Creative Cloud users can follow utilizing Cinema 4D Lite and After Effects.  Happy pixelating!

If you want to learn more about Sketch and Toon, be sure to check out my Creating Motion Graphics with Sketch and Toon course on lynda.com that is a comprehensive walkthrough of all the features in Sketch and Toon or the Cel Shader check out my quick breakdown of Sketch & Toon outlines in this tutorial and the Cel Shader in this tutorial.
I also have collections of useful Sketch and Toon ready 3D models in my Sketch and Toon Model Packs that you can turn into 8 bit art that you can find out more about here: Sketch and Toon Model Pack that you can find out more about here.

If you have any questions, be sure to post it in the comments section and if you create anything cool using this 8 bit workflow, I’d love to see it so be sure to share it with me on Twitter!  Thanks for watching!

This was recorded live on the Live Design Stream. To get alerted for future live design casts & get sneak peeks at new tutorials before anyone else, sign up for the Eyedesyn Newsletter.

Tutorial:

After Effects Tutorial: